Author: Lindly Haunani
A lifelong artist, Lindly was delighted when she discovered polymer clay in 1988. Admired for her gently empowering teaching style, Lindly has taught hundreds of polymer clay workshops during the past fifteen years. A founding member of the National Polymer Clay Guild and the co-editor of their newletter for three years, Lindly remains active in the polymer clay community.

Mechanical Intervention

|
Posted in Tools

There is the saying that “Necessity is the mother of invention”. While making precise uniformly-shaped beads from polymer clay isn’t exactly a necessity, it can be challenging to do so.  This is particularly the case when you want to make uniform elongated oval beads with two pionted ends. I first met Carl and Jean Hornberger at the National Polymer Clay Guild’s Annual retreat at Shrinemont in Orkney Springs Virginia. I was fascinated by the notion that they both were artists who used polymer clay, often collaborated on pieces together, had a blended family of thirteen children and complimented each other’s

Sushi

|
Posted in Artist's Commentary

Lindly Haunani, Sushi Platter, 1992 8″ x 5.5″ x 2.5″ polymer, translucent mokume gane with silver leaf, interference paints Finding the perfect gift for someone is always exciting, especially when happy memories are involved. In 1988 I purchased a beautifully illustrated Sushi cookbook for my father’s Christmas gift. Over the years one of the highlights of our shared culinary adventures had been watching the extremely talented chef’s at a local restaurant, the Mikado, make elaborate exquisite sushi platters. When we went to exchange gifts that year, I noticed a remarkable similarity in the size of the wrapped gifts. I was

Selection from the Collection: Asparagus Crown Bracelet

|
Posted in Artist's Commentary

Lindly Haunani, Asparagus Crown Bracelet, 2006 I have loved asparagus as long as I can remember. As a teenager I avidly read Euell Gibbon’s book “Stalking the Wild Asparagus” and have been hopefully looking closely at road side ditches ever since. Before the advent of year round/world wide asparagus in our local grocery store produce sections, asparagus and daffodils were certain harbingers of spring. I may have never perfected Hollandaise sauce a la Julia Childs’ “Mastering the Art of French Cooking, Volume One” if not for steamed asparagus.

Inch Worms on the Deck

|
Posted in Techniques

This event remains crystallized in my mind like a fly in amber, and may have not been what happened at all… Elise and I had just finished constructing the first all  metal tube bead cutter on her deck, when we spotted a small green inch worm making its way across the deck railing. We took the insect inside for closer inspection under the light on the studio desk. A small lump of light green clay, close to the color of the bug, made its way onto a bead mandrel, and instead of cutting all the way through the clay with

Tube Bead Inspirations

|
Posted in Artist's Commentary

There are times when the synchronicity of seeing a concept in “threes” propels me as an artist to experiment with and reinterpret an idea. Margaret Regan gave me a fabulously simple and elegant rainbow tube bead necklace. Her beads were small and delicate ( 1/2″ x 1/8 “) and strung with small black glass hex beads on elastic. I saw a large, outrageous dyed bamboo tube bead necklace at a clothing boutique Pier Voulkos gave a demo on tube bead construction on a rod at a workshop for the Art League School at the Torpedo Factory in Alexandria, Virginia My first versions