Author: Victoria Hughes

Victoria has been making and selling artowrk for more than 30 years. Her development and use of innovative techniques has influenced a generation of polymer clay artists both through her work, seen in numerous galleries and publication, and through her teaching career which has spanned the US and Canada. Victoria’s book, Polymer: The Chameleon Clay, was published by Krause in 2002.

Selection from the Collection: Orrery Neckpiece

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Posted in Artist's Commentary, Narrative Works

Tory Hughes, Orrery Neckpiece, 1992 Polymer and mixed media Why are we artists, anyway? For me, this career is the most flexible and marvelous -as in ‘full of marvels’- I could imagine. What other way of life encourages me to make such a marvelous thing as this? There’s a spinning comet in the upper left, mounted on miniature ball bearings; there are overlapping circles and arcs, toothed and smooth, a little plumb bob dangling at the upper right. This piece was a total joy to create. There were challenging moments, yup, but I love this one. Throw in tiny planetary

Selections from the Collection: Armillary Neckpiece

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Posted in Artist's Commentary, Narrative Works

Tory Hughes, Armillary Neckpiece, 1992 Polymer and mixed media I believe most art is a snapshot of answers we’ve found in that moment. My more meaningful pieces are all illustrations of my current set of solutions, like anatomical drawings from another era, beautiful even when superseded or augmented by more information. All of us have Grand Ideas that live within us, deep oceanic layers of connection to question, image, concept, content and feeling. I’ve found it best just to yield to those magnets, to sink into that familiar yet enigmatic embrace of what most identifies ‘me’ to ‘myself’, whether anyone

On The Road

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Posted in Artist Spotlight, Critical Commentary

One afternoon several years ago, Pier and I were driving slowly around Oakland and Alameda, looping along Interstate-980 in the ubiquitous dense traffic that proves you are in The Bay Area. She had picked me up at Jeremy Gordon’s house in Berkeley to take me over, see her studio, hang out a bit. We had already known each other for a while, in that sporadic shows-and-conferences way that many of us relate, but this was a slower, more personal meeting. We were enjoying the chance to talk at leisure, without an agenda, not between classes, but just as friends getting