MIPCES Exhibition: It’s a Wrap

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Posted in Artist's Commentary, Exhibitons and Shows

Six remaining artists participated in the MIPCES exhibition. If you are a new visitor to Polymer Art Archive, you can find background about this event in the 2 posts, Past, Present Future and All About MIPCES.

Nan Roche, CUP, 2” x 3” x 2”

Nan Roche's 6 Untitled Vessels as displayed in the MIPCES Exhibition

Nan Roche's 6 Untitled Vessels as displayed in the MIPCES Exhibition

Nan Roche, Untitled Vessel, 1997, back view

Nan Roche, Untitled Vessel, 1997, back view

For the MIPCES catalog, Nan Roche wrote:

“Language and the expression of it that we call writing, distinguishes humans from all other animals on our planet. It’s hard to say whether it exists because of our minds or whether our minds exist because of it. Awareness of ourselves as floating in a continuum of time, having a past and a future is notified by the marks we make. Since before I could read, I have been fascinated by the lines and patterns of writings so mysterious and remote but somehow so familiar. Running my fingers over these words links me to my human heritage in spirit and mind. I am interested in tapping those roots and pulling forward into the 21st century, ancient man-made marks in a modern man-made material.”

Kazuyo Yamashita, HEIAN 24” x 14” x ¼”

Kazuko Yanmshita with her work at the MIPCES exhibition Kazuyo Yamashita with her work at the MIPCES exhibition

For the MIPCES catalog, Kazuyo Yamashita wrote:

“I have been fascinated by the versatility of polymer clay that can simulate many ideas, especially in the area of surface design. I intertwine traditional Japanese designs with polymer clay and explore the possibility of creating ‘textile sculpture’.”

Jamey Allen, Untitled Necklaces, 1997

For the MIPCES catalog, Jamey Allen wrote:

“My work continues to be experimental in subtle ways. Necklaces contain beads and elements that are divergent, in terms of how canes are made, and products made from them; and sometimes contain metal elements. I have begun a series using the traditional form of the Pi from China, in various ways.

Currently I am intrigued by the bracelet form, using a metal base produced by Eberhard Faber, which is invested with a polymer band, decorated by different techniques, such as twining and millefiori.”

Jamey Allen and his work in the MIPCES Exhibition, 1997

Jamey Allen and his work in the MIPCES Exhibition, 1997

Jamey Allen, detail from Untitled Necklace, 1997

Jamey Allen, detail from Untitled Necklace, 1997

Donna Kato with her work in the MIPCES exhibition

Donna Kato with her work in the MIPCES exhibition

Three more of the MIPCES artists did not submit images or statements for the catalog.

Donna Kato, Trojan Horse, 1997

Donna Kato, Trojan Horse, 1997

You can read Donna Kato’s recent comments about this pieces in the post entitled Trojan Horse

Laura Liska with her work in the MIPCES exhibition

Laura Liska with her work in the MIPCES exhibition

Martha Breen, Circe, 1997

Martha Breen, Circe, 1997

You can read more about Martha Breen’s work in the posts entitiled The Early Development of Polymer Clay Beadmaking, Part 3 and More Early Images: Martha Breen